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SESSION 1: 11.15am – 12.30pm.

1. Gillian Clark Coming Home: How can Augustine’s Confessions work for us, in relation to our own spiritual practice?
“My Confessions praise God for bad things and for good, and rouse the mind and heart to Him. They worked for me as I wrote them, and still do as I read them.” – Augustine How can they work for us, in relation to our own spiritual practice? Our starting-point is Jesus’ story of the Prodigal Son, which is central to Augustine’s understanding of his own life.
Gillian Clark is Professor Emerita of Ancient History at the University of Bristol, UK, and a Fellow of the British Academy. She works especially on Augustine, who before he was Saint Augustine, the most influential theologian of western Christianity, was an overworked bishop addressing the social, political and religious challenges of the later Roman empire. Gillian is married to the philosopher Stephen R.L. Clark, and they have three children and four grandchildren.

2. Derek Woodard-Lehman The PCANZ’s “Justice in Action: We Say ‘Yes!’” statement – political awareness and social witness as church
We live in a world of choice. Our choices are rooted in who we are and what we want. In terms of politics, voting is presented as one such choice. An election is just another chance to express ourselves and pursue our desires. The language of interest and self-interest abounds, with far too little said about justice and the common good. In light of the PCANZ’s “Justice in Action: We Say ‘Yes!’” statement, how should we, as Presbyterians, approach the upcoming elections? Which issues should we prioritise? And how can the “We Say ‘Yes!’” document be used to raise political awareness and develop consensus about social witness in our congregations? This interactive workshop will review the “We Say ‘Yes!’” document and its theological background. And it will model a participatory process for congregational engagement of its content with a view to the September elections.
Derek Woodard-Lehman teaches in the Department Theology at University of Otago. He is based at St. Johns here in Wellington, where he oversees programming for the Centre for Theology and Public Issues. His research and teaching focus on how ordinary Christian practices and everyday faith inform and transform civic engagement and social movements.

3. Stephanie McIntyre The DCM commitment to ending homelessness
How does Stephanie lead the DCM team in their dedication to work with people others overlook? Come and be part of this workshop to hear how leadership has developed a unique way of working to ensure people are valued, treated with respect and their mana enhanced. You will quickly pick up the passion she has for ending homelessness in Wellington and across New Zealand (that existed long before the current crisis of accommodation). Also for over a decade, Stephanie has championed the establishment of ‘harm reduction’ housing as a bold yet highly effective accommodation option for people with long backgrounds of homelessness whose alcohol dependence results in them ending up on the streets of Wellington.
Stephanie McIntyre has been a champion of the most marginalised Wellingtonians throughout her working career, for the last 13 years as Director of Wellington’s DCM (Downtown Community Ministry). Her previous role was Social Justice Commissioner for the Anglican Church. Stephanie has an MA in Reflective Social Practice. Her work has been recognised with a Queen’s Service Order and a ‘Distinguished Alumni’ from Victoria University.

4. Murray Sheard Tearfund: The Gospel and Justice
This workshop explores how justice is a central theme in the Gospel. We look at Jesus’ own practice and ask what it means to follow Him in light of this. Through exercises and reflection, we’ll be challenged and enabled to examine our own experiences of injustice and uncover our own hearts for fighting injustice. We’ll also find some ways to get started. The workshop will be challenging, interactive and exploratory, using body, heart and mind.
Murray Sheard is the education and Advocacy Manager at Tearfund. Prior to this he founded a social enterprise workspace in Auckland and has worked for an anti-corruption agency working in 20 countries and based in London and Jerusalem. He is the chair of Christian conservation network A Rocha and an avid outdoors guy.

5. Jill Kayser Re-imagining church for secular New Zealand
In this workshop (aimed mainly for congregation leaders) we will reflect on why and how we can explore and find new ways of being church in our secular society. We will share inspiring stories, research, resources and learnings from our context and beyond, of churches finding new ways to be intergenerational “church”. “75% of fresh expressions of Church are all age focussed.” Anecdote to Evidence. Church Growth UK.
Jill Kayser is our Kids Friendly Coach. Jill has inspired and encouraged our churches in their ministry with children and families for 14 years. She is font of stories, research, ideas and resources that she loves to share with us to encourage and equip us in our ministry with children and families

6. Paul Somerville Empower Asia: Overseas Mission
"We are just an average Kiwi Presbyterian church, so can we really play a significant role in world mission? And can it be beneficial for our church as well?" Yes you can. How world missions can help develop your congregation - short term mission trips and congregation involvement - how Tokoroa Presbyterian kicked off world mission - pitfalls and positives - do's and dont's - developing your youth group through having a local church world missions program - justice - sex trafficking/child soldiers/unsafe employment
Paul Somerville is a missions entrepreneur. Growing up in Auckland, he attended Iona Presbyterian. On graduation from Otago University, he ministered within Tokoroa Presbyterian. Then he and Carlie moved to Thailand setting up Empower Asia. Now he directs this ministry in six Asian nations. He is informal, not big on structure or bureaucracy. Years ago he worked out that missions is not quite as hard as we may think.

SESSION 2: 2.45pm – 4.00pm.

1. Malcolm Gordon Songs for the Saints: Singing Together in Smaller Churches
Worship music has undergone something of a revolution in our time, and it has not always been a bloodless one! Differences have appeared along the lines of musical style, modes of performance and presentation, as well as the role of music in worship. This workshop will seek to clarify the priorities when choosing music for singing in congregations, as well as techniques around teaching music. During this workshop we will learn a number of new songs together, and form a 'Gathering Choir' that will help to lead worship through the remainder of the weekend.
Malcolm Gordon is a PCANZ minister, and serves as the Worship, Music and Arts Enabler for KCML. He is a songwriter whose songs are sung up and down the country and around the world. He is a creative worship leader who seeks to integrate a variety of people with a richness of practice to connect with our gracious and mysterious God.

2. Derek Woodard-Lehman The PCANZ’s “Justice in Action: We Say ‘Yes!’” statement – political awareness and social witness as church
We live in a world of choice. Our choices are rooted in who we are and what we want. In terms of politics, voting is presented as one such choice. An election is just another chance to express ourselves and pursue our desires. The language of interest and self-interest abounds, with far too little said about justice and the common good. In light of the PCANZ’s “Justice in Action: We Say ‘Yes!’” statement, how should we, as Presbyterians, approach the upcoming elections? Which issues should we prioritise? And how can the “We Say ‘Yes!’” document be used to raise political awareness and develop consensus about social witness in our congregations? This interactive workshop will review the “We Say ‘Yes!’” document and its theological background. And it will model a participatory process for congregational engagement of its content with a view to the September elections.
Derek Woodard-Lehman teaches in the Department Theology at University of Otago. He is based at St. Johns here in Wellington, where he oversees programming for the Centre for Theology and Public Issues. His research and teaching focus on how ordinary Christian practices and everyday faith inform and transform civic engagement and social movements.

3. Gordon Fitch Transformation In Youth
As well as imparting INFORMATION we need to intentionally add experiences that focus on FORMATION so that faith goes deeper and results in TRANSFORMATION. In this workshop we will look at 8 foundational pillars for faith formation and long-range curriculum planning.
Gordon Fitch has been a youth worker in the UK and the USA, serving in a number of different styles and sizes of churches. He is now the National Youth Manager for the Presbyterian Church, supporting youth workers, being a resource and sharing resources, hosting training and events, advocating for youth ministry and best practices, assisting in networking and promoting other organisations events. He supports Liverpool FC and has a computer science degree from the old days which does him no good today, so he gets all his technology advice from his kids.

4. Ross Scott Belief and the Hospital
How much do you know about Hospital Chaplaincy? This workshop will be facilitated by one of our own Hospital Chaplains, Rev Ross Scott, who hopes to initiate some discussion around a number of topics that Chaplains encounter: Death: do we still believe in it? Where is God when things go wrong: What is your foundational core belief? Faith as a resource or burden! A celebration of inconsistency in belief: Left side right side brain stuff. And more...!
Ross Scott has a farming upbringing and a degree in Agricultural Science. And with that he worked with street kids in central Christchurch before training for ministry. He has ministered in both parishes and hospitals. In 2000 Ross joined the staff of The NZ AIDS foundation in CHCH as a councillor working with those living with and affected by HIV. He is currently chaplain at Wellington and Wakefield Hospitals. Ross has two adult daughters and a grandson.

5) Jill Kayser Sharing our stories with children
In this workshop we will explore skills and ideas for sharing the stories of our faith with children in church, the children’s programme, community or homes. We will tell lots of stories and provide resources to equip and inspire you to ensure the children in your context ‘know our story’. “At the heart of our faith is a story that explains our understanding of the world, the place we have in that world and the way of life we are to pursue. The role of the Church is to help the community (including children) know ‘our’ story and internalise and act upon it.” – John Westerhoff
Jill Kayser is our Kids Friendly Coach. Jill has inspired and encouraged our churches in their ministry with children and families for 14 years. She is font of stories, research, ideas and resources that she loves to share with us to encourage and equip us in our ministry with children and families.

6) Paul Somerville Empower Asia: Overseas Mission
"We are just an average Kiwi Presbyterian church, so can we really play a significant role in world mission? And can it be beneficial for our church as well?" Yes you can. How world missions can help develop your congregation - short term mission trips and congregation involvement - how Tokoroa Presbyterian kicked off world mission - pitfalls and positives - do's and dont's - developing your youth group through having a local church world missions program - justice - sex trafficking/child soldiers/unsafe employment
Paul Somerville is a missions entrepreneur. Growing up in Auckland, he attended Iona Presbyterian. On graduation from Otago University, he ministered within Tokoroa Presbyterian. Then he and Carlie moved to Thailand setting up Empower Asia. Now he directs this ministry in six Asian nations. He is informal, not big on structure or bureaucracy. Years ago he worked out that missions is not quite as hard as we may think.

7) Perema Leasi “Lau o le fiso, lau o le Tolo, e ala e tasi i mauga i Olo” (“Many leaves are attached to one [solid] stem”)
The numerous streams of spiritual and cultural practices are of great significance, to the growth of this thriving parish. ‘Feeding in many, growing in one’ [spirit] reflects the pastoral and ministry practices being interwoven into the diversity of spiritual leaves that nourishes all into one stem (of solidarity and continuity).This facilitation will explore how these streams (ethnicity, languages, aged-group, social, cultural and community values and practices) being nourished within 15 years of my ministry in Christ the King (and Porirua community).
Perema Leasi is Minister at PIPC (Pacific Islands Presbyterian Church) Porirua. Speaker and preacher of 3 languages; Cook Islands, Tokelauan, Samoan and English. Former Presbytery Moderator; Wellington Presbytery. Chair of the Wellington Pacific Bible College, Secretary; the Wellington Samoan Ministers Fellowship. Recipient of the Porirua City’s 50th Anniversary for his pastoral to the prisons and prisoners.continues to be aware of the privilege it is to accompany people from time to time through the ambiguities, threats and joys of life. He has come to see himself, in part, as a space creator, an oxygen provider, so that people might find room to breathe, and perhaps sense the presence of grace for them.

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Presbytery Central Inauguration 2013

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